Blue Heart

BY CARYL CHURCHILL
13 October 2016 — 19 November 2016

★★★★★ "pushes the edges of what a play can be... reveals something incredibly truthful and humane" Reviews Hub

★★★★ “directed with great brio by David Mercatali and superbly acted” Michael Billington, The Guardian - read the full review

★★★★ "Brilliantly entertaining and entirely confounding all at once" Daisy Bowie-Sell, WhatsOnStage - read the full review

★★★★ "Churchill's writing is so virtuosic... David Mercatali’s production is excellent: precise, playful and tough. The excellent ensemble rise to the exorbitant technical demands but also the weighty emotions semi-submerged in the wry, haunting otherness of Churchill’s works." Andrzej Lukowski, Time Out - read the full review

★★★★ “These two one-act plays by Caryl Churchill are portraits of domestic anarchy, in which humdrum events mutate into a deliciously warped absurdity… we’re left feeling invigorated.” Henry Hitchings, Evening Standard - read the full review

★★★★ “A warm welcome for this exhilarating revival… It would be invidious to single out particular actors in Mercatali's ensemble. But they are great collective interpreters of Churchill, as is proved by the exquisite lightness of touch with which they modulate from brisk puzzling playfulness to a sort of bleak poignancy in the handling of this play.” Paul Taylor, Independent - read the full review

★★★★ "pumps with narrative energy... The cast is super slick... outrageously funny... Director David Mercatali’s confident touch allows the production to embrace the bizarreness and beauty of these plays. And that these experimental pieces are at once so moving and intellectually challenging is almost mind-blowing." Sally Hales, Exeunt

★★★★ “a breathtakingly confident imagination and thrilling theatrical panache…  David Mercatali’s precise and exciting revival…  an event that is both playful and genre-busting, excruciating and exhilarating, alarming and truthful.” Aleks Sierz, The Arts Desk - read the full review

★★★★ "Under the direction of David Mercatali, the domestic veneer of the two one-act plays is kept brightly polished, yet a palpable anxiety bubbles beneath." The Stage