Sing to Me Through Open Windows / The Private Ear

BY ARTHUR KOPIT & PETER SHAFFER
3 June 2009 — 20 June 2009

Trainee Directors Showcase production.

There are now six Artistic Directors of major UK theatres who began their careers at the Orange Tree Theatre. These are the directors of the Hampstead Theatre, The Lyric Theatre Hammersmith, Regents Park Open Air Theatre, The Traverse Theatre Edinburgh, The Birmingham Repertory Theatre and the Southwark Playhouse.

Sing to Me Through Open Windows, by Arthur Kopit. Directed by Andy Brunskill.

'Fear. Remember that word. You think you know what it means but you never do'.

On the first day of spring each year Andrew visits the isolated home of Ottoman Jud, a passe magician, and his helper, Loveless, who is dressed as a clown. When he gets there he is offered tea, conversation, magic and the opportunity to witness an impromptu circus act.

Written 50 years ago and not produced in the UK until now, this is a dream-like exploration into the loss of childhood magic and life's transitions.

'Astonishingly sophisticated...a mood mixing the everyday and the elegiac', Reviewsgate. 'The play gathers to a head of elegaic melancholy', Theatreworld.

‘Open and enticing', Live in London.

The Private Ear, by Peter Shaffer. Directed by David Siebert

'It's not every day you invite a girl to dinner, is it? Let's be honest. You go to hundreds of concerts, but you don't usually pick up a girl and invite her home, do you? So what gives?'

It's 1962. Bob is a shy young man with a life revolving around his beloved stereo and record collection. But this evening in his shabby flat he nervously awaits the arrival of Doreen for his first dinner date. To help with the cooking and the conversation, he has also invited his 'chic' and more experienced workmate Ted. Bob wants to impress, but will Ted, mushroom soup, rose wine and Benjamin Britten do the trick?

'Ultra-realist rendition...impeccably realised...deftly done', Time Out.

'A well observed, strongly retro production…a welcome, well cast revival', British Theatre Guide.

'On this evidence, the play deserves a full revival with its other half The Public Eye,' WhatsOnStage.